Woven Ink
IMG_7486.jpg

Common Ground: Culture, Climate and Social Justice

How can the cultural sector support an intersectional approach to the climate crisis, and enable us to shape a just future for all? This conference hosted by Julia’s Bicycle invited attendees to discuss climate and social justice through the lens of global inequality.

We are all stewards of our planet, but the effects of climate change are not shared equally. While it is people in the Global South and marginalised communities in the Global North who are the first to feel the impacts of environmental degradation, extreme weather events, food crop failure, and air pollution, their voices are rarely heard within environmental movements in the UK. Without representing communities at the sharpest end of climate impacts the stories we tell are incomplete; drawing focus to their lived experiences and creative responses are crucial to developing a holistic understanding of the causes of and solutions to this unfolding crisis.

This day long conference hosted by Julia’s Bicycle invited people to discuss climate and social justice through the lens of global inequality, access to nature and the public realm, wellbeing and mental health, and sustainable food initiatives.

How can the cultural sector support an intersectional approach to the climate crisis, and enable us to shape a just future for all?

What does it mean to talk about race in the climate crisis?


1.Julie's_Bicycle_Visual_Minutes_WEBSITE.jpg

Artwork created by Isolde Godfrey & Jessica Harvey

Julie’s Bicycle worked with Woven Ink for an event on climate justice. We are really impressed by the beautiful dynamic image that was created, which neatly captured quotes, portraits, images and interlinking narrative from across the day. Jess and Isolde were a pleasure to work with, and helpfully summarised the final image they’d produced for attendees during our closing session too.
— Ruby Kvalheim, Julie's Bicycle

Photography by Angela Dennis